The stickiness of weight stigma: An examination of residual weight stigma, stigma targets, and willingness to date.

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Asbury, Mary Beth
dc.contributor.author Kratzer, Jessica M. W
dc.contributor.author Brinthaupt, Thomas M.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-08-15T20:25:45Z
dc.date.available 2017-08-15T20:25:45Z
dc.date.issued 2017-02-23
dc.identifier.uri http://jewlscholar.mtsu.edu/xmlui/handle/mtsu/5346
dc.description.abstract This research examined the stickiness of stigma related to being overweight and dating. Three studies explored whether residual weight stigma exists by comparing being overweight to other stigmatized conditions. The first study showed little evidence that overweight was a stigmatizing condition, with participants showing similarities in willingness to date someone who is overweight compared to other physical or medical conditions. There was partial support in the second study for the prediction that overweight was a stigmatizing condition in comparison to conditions related to physical appearance. The third study indicated that there is a tendency for participants to attribute greater personal responsibility for the overweight condition compared to other conditions. Taken together, the results provided little evidence for residual stigma associated with the overweight condition and dating preferences. en_US
dc.publisher Middle Tennessee State University, Department of Communication, College of Liberal Arts en_US
dc.subject Stigma en_US
dc.subject Social stigma en_US
dc.subject Appearance stigma en_US
dc.subject Dating en_US
dc.subject Residual weight stigma en_US
dc.title The stickiness of weight stigma: An examination of residual weight stigma, stigma targets, and willingness to date. en_US
dc.type Article en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search JEWLScholar@MTSU


Browse

My Account

Statistics