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POWER, PATRONAGE, AND PRESERVATION: FEDERAL HIGHWAY DEVELOPMENT IN MIDDLE TENNESSEE, 1920-1980

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dc.contributor.advisor West, Carroll
dc.contributor.author Holden, Joshua Ethan
dc.date.accessioned 2018-06-05T20:04:53Z
dc.date.available 2018-06-05T20:04:53Z
dc.date.issued 2018-03-26
dc.identifier.uri http://jewlscholar.mtsu.edu/xmlui/handle/mtsu/5667
dc.description.abstract This thesis addresses several topics relevant to transportation history in Tennessee. Through analyzing the Edsel Floyd Bridge located in Watertown, Tennessee, the history of early highway building trends, the history of the Watertown community, and the ways in which memorialization shapes landscapes are explored. Furthermore, by looking at the Austin Peay Papers located at the Tennessee State Library and Archives this thesis examines the Memphis-Bristol Highway and the systems of power and patronage that surrounded its construction during his administrations from 1923-1927. Finally, this thesis surveys U.S. 70N from Lebanon, Tennessee to Gentry in Putnam County, Tennessee and interprets this corridor in a New Deal context.
dc.description.abstract My study of the Edsel Floyd Bridge illuminates the different methods of memorialization and the forms they take on the landscape. Rather than naming a community center or a park after Edsel Floyd, the town instead chose to name the concrete arch bridge on U.S. 70 after one of their most well-known citizens. This is indicative not only of a movement to memorialize individuals or events in “useful” features in the landscape as opposed to monuments or plaques but also a way in which the community exerted their control and projected their values upon the state highway. The second chapter reveals that Austin Peay, a candidate that promised to take the politics of road building, instead propagated and utilized systems of power and patronage to build the Memphis-Bristol highway. Finally, my analysis of the resources and character of U.S. 70N reveal a complex and nuanced New Deal landscape. Features such as the Cordell Hull Bridge and the built form of U.S. 70N from Lebanon to Carthage show that while New Deal resources could provide stimulus for communities affected by their projects, they also changed the landscape and fabric of the communities they touched.
dc.publisher Middle Tennessee State University
dc.subject Austin Peay
dc.subject Cultural Landscapes
dc.subject Highways
dc.subject New Deal
dc.subject Tennessee
dc.subject Transportation
dc.title POWER, PATRONAGE, AND PRESERVATION: FEDERAL HIGHWAY DEVELOPMENT IN MIDDLE TENNESSEE, 1920-1980
dc.type Thesis
dc.contributor.committeemember Kyriakoudes, Louis
dc.thesis.degreelevel Masters
dc.thesis.degreegrantor Middle Tennessee State University
dc.subject.umi History
dc.subject.umi Transportation
dc.description.degree M.A.
dc.contributor.department History


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