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THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES AND EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONING DIMENSIONS

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dc.contributor.author Wilson, Kathryn
dc.date.accessioned 2020-05-13T19:02:20Z
dc.date.available 2020-05-13T19:02:20Z
dc.identifier.uri https://jewlscholar.mtsu.edu/handle/mtsu/6217
dc.description.abstract ABSTRACT More research is needed that investigates how and to what extent adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are predicted by neurocognitive executive functioning (EF) skills. To address this, the current study analyzed how ACEs were predicted by two core dimensions of executive functioning (EF), that is, inhibition (i.e., behavior regulation skills) and working memory (i.e., metacognition skills). College students (N =388 ) were administered the ACE Questionnaire, (Felitti et al., 1998), and the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function Adult Version (BRIEF-A; Roth, Isquith, & Gioia, 2005). Results indicated ACEs significantly predicted more difficulty with global EF skills. This was also the case when each EF dimensions was looked at individually. ACEs predicted more EF inhibition and working memory problems. ACEs were slightly more associated with EF inhibition difficulties in comparison to EF working memory difficulties. These findings contribute to ACEs and EF research by utilizing an EF dimensional approach on a non-clinical US sample of college students.
dc.title THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES AND EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONING DIMENSIONS
dc.date.updated 2020-05-13T19:02:21Z
dc.language.rfc3066 en


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